Health Screenings FAQs & Resources

Below is a list of frequently asked questions from clients just like yourself about health screenings, as well as some other helpful resources. If you have additional questions, please contact us today.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Q: Can I customize my health screening event and provide various screenings?
    A: Yes, we provide many screening options. You can customize your screening according to your employee group.
  • Q: Do participants have to fast for the blood screenings?
    A: Fasting for 9 hours or more is recommended, but not required for our finger-stick screenings. Total Cholesterol, HDL, Total Cholesterol/HDL Ratio, and Glucose are accurately evaluated without fasting, but participants must fast to receive their LDL and Triglyceride values. We do require a 12 hour fast for all venipuncture blood-draw tests.
  • Q: Does TotalWellness offer aggregate reporting on biometric screenings?
    A: Yes, we offer aggregate reporting through an online dashboard, giving you the ability to customize and create your reports.
  • Q: How far in advance do I need to request an event?
    A: We recommend submitting your request at least 60 days in advance, but we can usually accommodate events with less notice.
  • Q: Who will be facilitating the screenings?
    A: We send an experienced event coordinator to each event and we facilitate the event with our network of trained medical professionals. Since we are a national company, many of our professionals reside in your area.
  • Q: I have employees who work second and third shifts; can TotalWellness coordinate screening events during all hours?
    A: We are accustomed to organizing events around the clock to accommodate all employees’ shifts.
  • Q: What is the minimum number of participants I need to hold a health screening event?
    A: Generally we have a minimum order of 30 screenings per event; however, we often lower this minimum for clients.
  • Q: Are participants required to pre-register for screenings?
    A: No, we do not require employees to pre-register for their screenings. However, to cut down on wait time and to make the event smooth and successful, we highly recommend that participants sign up in advance. Our proprietary tool, Register My Time helps the company schedule appointments online.

Screening Glossary

  • Blood Pressure Check
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    High blood pressure may indicate an increased risk of stroke, heart disease, or other illness. A cuff is placed on a participant’s arm and gently tightened and released to gather the blood pressure reading.
  • Body Fat Screening
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    Too much fat increases your risk for disease and too little fat is linked to problems with temperature regulation, hunger, fatigue, depression, and fertility in women. The participant holds a small bio-electrical device and pushes a button. The device does its job with no feeling to the participant.
  • Bone Density Screening
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    Bone density is an indicator of osteoporosis risk. Ultrasound technology is utilized to measure the density of the health bone. The test is quick, easy, and pain free.
  • Carotid Artery Ultrasound Screening
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    The carotid artery supplies the majority of blood flow to the brain. Narrowing of the carotid artery increases the risk of stroke. An ultrasound wand is gently circled on the neck and an image is produced on a computer screen showing the artery and possible blockage.
  • Chair Massage
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    Massage offers a relaxing opportunities for participants to relieve stress. Participants are seated and receive a back, neck, and arm massage. Clients are able to set the massage length.
  • Colorectal Cancer Screening
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    Participants 50 years and older are at higher risk for this disease, so screening is recommended. Participants are provided with “throw-in-the-bowl” take home kits that change color when blood is present in the stool. Blood in the stool can be an indicator of Colorectal Cancer.
  • Fitness Testing
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    This test evaluates a participant’s aerobic (endurance) and anaerobic (strength & power) energy systems. Participants tightly grip a handheld dynamometer to measure their strength and power. The Harvard Step Test, a 3 minute test in which participants step up and down on a step in accordance with a metronome pace, is utilized to measure endurance. Participants complete the test and then our staff monitor their heart rate and recovery to determine endurance.
  • Pulmonary Function Testing
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    This test measures lung capacity. Participants blow hard and fast into a small, hand-held spirometer which measures their pulmonary function and displays participant’s results on a computer screen.
  • Skin Screening & Sun Damage Test
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    This test locates oily skin, sun-damaged skin, occluded pores, and overly dry skin on the face. A DermaView™ Facial Analyzer uses special lighting to show problem areas on the face.

Blood Screenings

  • Cholesterol Test
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    Too much cholesterol can indicate increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Blood samples are gathered through a finger-stick or a venipuncture. Total Cholesterol, HDL Cholesterol, LDL Cholesterol, TC/HDL Ratio values can be provided. Participants do not need to fast for TC, HDL, or TC/HDL ratio to be provided. Participants must fast for at least 9 hours for LDL readings to be provided.
  • Glucose Test
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    Increased glucose blood levels can be an indicator of diabetes. Blood samples are gathered through a finger-stick or a venipuncture. Participants do not need to fast for glucose readings to be provided.
  • Triglyceride Test
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    Triglycerides indicate the fat in the blood. Too much fat in the blood can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Blood samples are gathered through a finger-stick or venipuncture. Participants must fast for at least 9 hours for triglyceride values to be accurate.
  • Cancer Antigen 125 (CA-125)
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    Cancer Antigen is a protein found on the surface of many ovarian cancer cells. Blood samples are gathered through a venipuncture blood draw.
  • Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH)
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    TSH measures thyroid gland function, which is related to multiple metabolic disorders. Blood samples are gathered via a venipuncture blood draw.
  • Cotinine
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    Cotinine, is a metabolite of nicotine and reports positive or negative tobacco use. Blood samples are gathered via a venipuncture blood draw, or saliva samples are collected and analyzed on-site.
  • Homocystein
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    Homocystein accurately describes an individual’s risk of atherosclerosis, or fatty build up in the arteries. Blood samples are gathered via a venipuncture blood draw.
  • Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C)
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    HbA1C measures average blood glucose over a 3 month period and helps assess risk for type II diabetes. Blood samples are gathered either through a finger-stick or a venipuncture blood draw.
  • Highly Sensitive C- Reactive Protein (CRP)
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    Testing the level of CRP in the blood can aid in the detection of heart disease. Blood samples are gathered via a venipuncture blood draw.

Educational Services

  • Hand Washing Education
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    This educational displays illustrates how easily germs can be spread. Participants apply luminescent lotion to their hands and place them under a UV light to illustrate how easily germs can spread.
  • Interactive Educational Displays
    Why it is important… How the screening is conducted…
    Participants receive education on a variety of health topics. Tabletop displays and interactive models are provided on topics including Nutrition, Heart Health, Exercise, Diabetes, Stress Management, Effects of Tobacco Use, Women’s Health, and Men’s Health.